Yukon Register of Historic PlacesYRHP

Watson Lake Sign Post Forest

Watson Lake Sign Post Forest

Watson Lake Sign Post Forest

Watson Lake Sign Post Forest

Watson Lake Sign Post Forest

Watson Lake Sign Post Forest

Watson Lake Sign Post Forest

Watson Lake Sign Post Forest

Watson Lake Sign Post Forest

Cultural History

Watson Lake Sign Post Forest

Cultural History

The story of Carl K. Lindley is well-known. As a 21-year-old soldier with Company D of 341st Engineers, Lindley was involved in the construction of the Alaska Highway in 1942. At their camps along the highway, the Army Corps of Engineers followed a practice of installing mileage posts listing places and distances to other places in the Yukon, and other parts of North America and the world. One such army sign post was installed at the Wye, the corner of the Alaska Highway and road to the military airport of Watson Lake. Lindley worked at a sawmill that provided logs for the bridges until he was injured and was sent to Watson Lake. As he related the story:

I had received an injury near the border of B.C. and Yukon, just North of Lower Post. My foot was smashed while building a platform to fill dump trucks. I was taken to the Company aid station at nearby Watson Lake where I spent the next three weeks recuperating. Not able to do much work the C.O. asked if I could repair and repaint the sign that had been run over by bulldozers. I asked if I could add my hometown sign of Danville, Illinois as I was homesick for my hometown and my girlfriend Eleanor.