MAYO MINING RECORDER'S OFFICE

The Mabel McIntyre House was the first Mining Recorder's Office constructed in Mayo. Built in 1921, as the production of gold in the Klondike was declining, it heralded the onset of a mining boom that would make the Mayo Mining District the chief economic engine in the Yukon. The Mining Recorder's Office represented the federal government's broad and prominent administrative role in the community. The Mining Recorder's duties ranged from the agent enforcing mining regulations to Marriage Commissioner, Justice of the Peace and Juvenile Court Magistrate. The building's rustic frontier style was characteristic of early, regional Mining Recorder's Offices in the Yukon. It was an integral part of the rapid development of the commercial district of the community and is the oldest building still located on its original site on Centre Street. The building was later the residence of Mabel McIntyre, a member of the First Nation of Na Cho Nyak Dun, who lived here from 1946 until 1981. Mabel was a noteworthy and respected community member, serving as postmistress for 30 years. Source: Heritage Resources Unit file 3630 30 02 02

Construction Period: From 1906 to 1939        Designation Level: Territorial

The Mabel McIntyre House was the first Mining Recorder's Office constructed in Mayo. Built in 1921, as the production of gold in the Klondike was declining, it heralded the onset of a mining boom that would make the Mayo Mining District the chief economic engine in the Yukon. The Mining Recorder's Office represented the federal government's broad and prominent administrative role in the community. The Mining Recorder's duties ranged from the agent enforcing mining regulations to Marriage Commissioner, Justice of the Peace and Juvenile Court Magistrate.

The building's rustic frontier style was characteristic of early, regional Mining Recorder's Offices in the Yukon. It was an integral part of the rapid development of the commercial district of the community and is the oldest building still located on its original site on Centre Street.

The building was later the residence of Mabel McIntyre, a member of the First Nation of Na Cho Nyak Dun, who lived here from 1946 until 1981. Mabel was a noteworthy and respected community member, serving as postmistress for 30 years.

Source: Heritage Resources Unit file 3630 30 02 02

Character Defining Elements

-The siting on the lot and its orientation towards Centre Street

-The cabin's simple rectangular plan, its modest size and rustic saddle-notched log construction

-Architectural elements such as the roof, shed attachment, door and window openings, historic sashes and trim

-The lack of modern amenities and rough interior finishing

Description of Boundaries

Block 6, South half of Lots 29 & 30, Plan 12544 Mayo Town site.

Historical Sources Location

Yukon Historic Sites Inventory

Gold and Galena: A History of the Mayo District. Mayo Historical Society. Mayo, Yukon, 1990.

Heritage Resources Unit file #3630 30 02 02.

Cultural History

In Mayo, before the inception of the Mining Recorders Office, miners were forced to either work the claim without staking it, or had to make their way to Dawson in order to record it there.

The first Mining Recorder Office was established in Clear Creek in 1901, and the area became known as the Clear Creek Mining District. The next year, with increased prospecting and mining activity in the region, offices were opened at Gordon Landing and at Minto Bridge. It was decided that a town must be established in the area to accommodate this newfound population. In 1903, Raoul Rinfret, Joseph Edward Beliveau and John Dease Bell surveyed the Mayo site. The surveyed area was found to be a suitable town site due to its close proximity to Duncan Creek, but also because of the nature of that area of the Stewart River; the flattened banks were more accessible to riverboats.

The Minto Bridge office was moved to Mayo Landing in 1914, but was not named the Mayo Landing Mining Recorder's Office until 1918. Louis Bouvette made a startling silver discovery on Keno Hill in 1919, however, the office had shutdown and his recorded claim was taken by J.E. Ferrell, who owned a store in Mayo and doubled as Mining Recorder. The subsequent stampede to Keno Hill made it necessary to reinstate the Mining Recorder's Office, and in 1920, the district became known as the Mayo Mining District. Mayo was named Mayo Landing until the name was officially shortened to Mayo in 1958.

Sam Blackmore built this office in 1921. This was the first official Mining Recorder's office in Mayo and was used for this purpose until 1933, when the office moved to another building. Richard L. "Dick" Gillespie was the first Mining Recorder in the Mayo area. (Linda E.T. MacDonald and Lynette R. Bleiler, Gold and Galena: A History of the Mayo District. Mayo Historical Society. Mayo, Yukon. 1990: pp 56, 57, 379)

Mabel McIntyre, the daughter of Grant Huffman, was born in Mayo on December 7, 1912. Mabel and her brother Albert were sent away to school in Chicago, returning to Mayo in the mid 1920's where they lived with Grant on his homestead in Mayo Canyon. Albert stayed to earn enough money to return back to Chicago, and Mabel stayed for a short while, then went to work in Keno City. She worked for the Keno Hotel as a chambermaid and later moved to Mayo to work in Binet's hotel. Sam Blackmore willed the building to Mabel and she lived in the cabin from 1946 until 1981. Mabel retired in 1972 from her postmistress position at the Mayo post-office. She died in 1986. (Ibid. p 420)

Documentation Location

Heritage Resources Unit file #3630 30 02 02

Building Style

This is a single story structure of horizontal log construction with saddle-notched corners and a low pitched gable roof clad with ribbed sheet metal. The frame addition off of the north wall has a shed style roof clad with corrugated metal and flush eaves, the walls are of horizontal planks of random width. The building was built at grade and there is minimal or no foundation. A root cellar is in the main portion of the cabin. The interior has a partition of dimensional lumber and the floor framing is a mixture of log and dimensional lumber. The roofing has changed over the years, however the existing roof still has the original sod roof below.