THE TAYLOR HOUSE

The Taylor House and lots is a municipally designated site designated for its architecture and association with the Taylor family. It was constructed in 1937 as a residence for Bill and Aline Taylor. The Taylor family contributed to the early growth and economic development of the Yukon through the mercantile chain, the Taylor and Drury Company. The company operated up to nineteen stores in Yukon communities from the turn of the century until the 1960s. This relatively large log home and spacious landscaped lots, by Whitehorse standards, reflects the success of the family-owned business and the upper class of Whitehorse of the period. The design of the Taylor House is eclectic, showing the influence of the American Arts and Crafts Movement as well as the (American) Colonial Revival. It represents a type of housing design commonly self-built during its time period that could be found in national publications and catalogues. The Taylor House was built of mainly local construction materials combined with the most modern amenities that were available in Whitehorse. The setting and location of the Taylor House is important as it portrays the residential ambiance that was once an integral part of Main Street. It is a landmark in the historic downtown area of Whitehorse. Source: Minutes from the City of Whitehorse Heritage Advisory Committee, Oct 25, 2001 City of Whitehorse Bylaw 2001-62

Construction Period: From 1906 to 1939        Designation Level: Municipal

The Taylor House and lots is a municipally designated site designated for its architecture and association with the Taylor family.

It was constructed in 1937 as a residence for Bill and Aline Taylor. The Taylor family contributed to the early growth and economic development of the Yukon through the mercantile chain, the Taylor and Drury Company. The company operated up to nineteen stores in Yukon communities from the turn of the century until the 1960s. This relatively large log home and spacious landscaped lots, by Whitehorse standards, reflects the success of the family-owned business and the upper class of Whitehorse of the period.

The design of the Taylor House is eclectic, showing the influence of the American Arts and Crafts Movement as well as the (American) Colonial Revival. It represents a type of housing design commonly self-built during its time period that could be found in national publications and catalogues. The Taylor House was built of mainly local construction materials combined with the most modern amenities that were available in Whitehorse.

The setting and location of the Taylor House is important as it portrays the residential ambiance that was once an integral part of Main Street. It is a landmark in the historic downtown area of Whitehorse.

Source: Minutes from the City of Whitehorse Heritage Advisory Committee, Oct 25, 2001

City of Whitehorse Bylaw 2001-62

Additional Information

Biographical Information: Isaac Taylor: born in Thirsk, Yorkshire. Came to the Yukon in 1898. "Ike" Taylor and W.S. Drury opened eighteen Taylor and Drury stores throughout the Yukon. They began their 75 year partnership in Atlin, B.C. in 1899. When the railroad was completed to Bennett, Taylor and Drury moved their shop from Atlin to Bennett. They were both familiar with the clothing trade, and Drury was a shoemaker with a sturdy sewing machine. He kept himself busy making sails for boats and scows travelling to Dawson. When the railway was completed a year later, Taylor and Drury moved to Whitehorse on the first train. Almost overnight, Whitehorse had became a rail and river transport centre. Taylor and Drury set their tent up on the river bank, at what is now First Avenue and Elliott Street, and in less than a year had expanded their business to include the Bon Marche Men's Wear Store on First Avenue at Steele Street. Taylor died in 1959.

Character Defining Elements

- location and setting

- exposed log construction, exterior metal chimneys, gambrel wood shingled roof with dormers and bell cast eaves

- the wood windows and doors, and leaded glass

- the brick fireplace in the full basement

- the original gates and the wooden picket fence that encloses the spacious landscaped yard with its mix of indigenous and introduced mature trees and shrubs

Description of Boundaries

Lots 5 and 6, Block 36, Plan 3807

Historical Sources Location

YHMA File:

--acc. #Y039, Historic Buildings of Whitehorse, Yukon Historical & Museum's Association, 1980, text & photographs

--brief interviews with Dorothy Howett, Bert Law and Bill Taylor, 1983.

--text from 1979 photo display

--biographical information on Isaac Taylor

--letter from YHMA to Yukon Chamber of Mines regarding preservation of Taylor house

--Yukon Chamber of Mines information sheet

--5 frames of B&W negatives, 1979, credit Daryl Peacock

Yukon Archives:

--photo # 4078 (1945)

Cultural History

The Taylor & Drury Company, co-founded by Isaac Taylor and WS Drury in 1897, grew quickly into a Yukon-wide mercantile chain. Bill, the son of Isaac and Sarah Drury Taylor, worked for the Taylor & Drury Company during his teen years, and advanced to full time after high school. Bill met Aline Arbour Cyr at the Lambert Street school in Whitehorse. Aline, her brother, and her mother were among the early Francophones to settle in Whitehorse. Bill and Aline were married in 1935 at the Old Log Church; they rented a house for two years until they purchased the 412 Main St. property. Aline Taylor obtained the plans for this residence from magazines and hired local resident Thomas McKay to build it. In May 1937, Bill and Aline Taylor harvested their house logs approximately 10 miles from Whitehorse and then stacked them for drying at 412 Main Street. By December of the same year, the house was ready for occupancy.

By 1928 the company operated twelve stores in the Yukon and a Whitehorse dealership for General Motors. By 1930 he was the chief accounting official for all of the stores, fur buyer, and worked in the company's management sector. As the population in the Yukon dropped and the mercantile business declined, the Taylor and Drury Stores closed, leaving only the Whitehorse operations functioning until 1974.

The Taylor House was sold in 1969 to the Chamber of Mines when the mining industry was the major economic activity in the Yukon. The Chamber of Mines began having difficulties in the early 1990s when the price of gold declined and the cost of fuel increased. Unable to afford the necessary renovations and maintenance on the building, the Chamber sold the property to the Yukon Government in 1997. The government completed extensive interior renovations to adapt the house for office space. It is currently (2006) leased.

Documentation Location

Heritage Resources, Department of Tourism & Culture, Government of Yukon, file #3792-01

Building Style

The Taylor House is of horizontal log construction with a bell-cast gambrel roof and shed roofed dormers. Both the roof and dormer roofs have wood shingles. The peeled and painted logs are likely connected by mortise and tenon to the vertical quarter posts at the corners of the building, however it is not possible to confirm this through a visual investigation. The interior is framed with dimensional lumber and there is a full concrete basement. There is an exterior metal chimney on both the east and west walls.

YRHP Additional Information

Personal Account by Marilyn Taylor

Taylor House, Whitehorse, Yukon

‘The Old House’ at 412 Main Street brings back happy memories and stories to me, my children, and grandchildren each time we drive by or reminisce.

My father, William (Bill) Taylor, born in 1909, was the eldest son of Isaac and Sarah Drury Taylor. He was active in the family mercantile company founded by his father and uncle in 1898 which expanded to 13 branches throughout the territory and a General Motors dealership. My mother, Aline Arbour Cyr came to the Yukon at the age of six with her brother and recently-widowed mother and were among the early francophones in Whitehorse. Bill and Aline were married in the Old Log Church in 1935.

In 1937, they bought two lots (100 x 100) from White Pass & Yukon Route situated at the corner of 5th Avenue and Main Street on “the edge of town.” Now the house sits in the heart of downtown Whitehorse. Main Street had a horse wagon trail beyond 4th Avenue, and Bill cut out the lane in the block and built a sidewalk, those tasks being the responsibility of the owner.

In May of 1937 Bill and Aline cut down trees about 10 miles from downtown Whitehorse. Late one evening, they were notified of a bush fire where the logs were situated. With the help of Aline’s brother, they loaded logs on a one-ton truck, making many trips from the bush to town. The logs were stacked for drying on their two lots, and in August they were ready for building. The basement was dug with horses and scrapers. All lumber was purchased through White Pass, and other materials, fixtures and furniture were purchased through the family business, Taylor & Drury Ltd.

After electricity, a well, septic system, and a wood furnace were installed, Bill and Aline moved in and did much of the work on the house themselves. With Bill working at Taylor & Drury, they had only Sundays and weekday evenings available to work on the house. In 1946, the house was raised, and a full-size concrete basement was added. This included a large rumpus room where family and friends could gather. The Taylors also provided this room to the United Church of Canada for Sunday School for a few years until the church was built. In 1950, the second floor was completed, housing 2 bedrooms, bathroom, and study for their son and daughter.

The yard originally was kept natural with granite spread from the Pueblo Mine area. Poppies grew wildly throughout the pines and spruces. The lots were fully fenced and were a popular pastime for the children in the neighborhood to see how many times they could crawl around the horizontal railing on their knees and no hands without falling off. Bill planted a blue spruce in the front yard and was always decorated with blue and green lights for the Christmas season.

In 1969, due to the expansion of business and traffic, they sold the house to the Yukon Chamber of Mines who occupied it until they sold it to the Yukon Government in 1997. The interior of the house has been renovated to house the Yukon Heritage Resources Board, but the exterior has changed very little since its construction. It continues to provide a view of historic Whitehorse to visitors.